Molla Nasreddin

Slavs and Tatars presents "Molla Nasreddin: the magazine that would’ve, could’ve, should’ve." It features a selection of the most iconic covers, illustrations and caricatures from the legendary Azeri satirical periodical of the early 20th century, "Molla Nasreddin." The most important publication of its kind, "Molla Nasreddin" was read across the Muslim world from Morocco to Iran, addressing issues whose relevance has not abated, such as women’s rights, the Latinization of the alphabet, Western imperial powers, creeping socialism from Russia in the north, and growing Islamism from Iran in the south. "Molla Nasreddin" not only contributed to a crucial understanding of national identity in the case study of the complexity called the Caucasus, but offered a momentous example of the powers of the press both then and today.

The publication is part of the series of artists’ projects edited by Christoph Keller.

2011

Offset print, 24 x 28 cm, 208 pages, color throughout, glue and stitched binding with solve gloss laminated and black foil embossed cover, edition of 1,700. Available via jrp|ringier.

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Reviews:

 

Zenith

The Guardian

Asian Review of Books

Radikal

The New Yorker

Basler Zeitung

Metropolis M

artfagcity.com

 

Video:


Molla Nasreddin: Embrace Your Antithesis talk at SALT Beyoğlu, Istanbul


Art Salon, Art Basel Book Launch talk


Book Launch Talk at Bidoun Library, Serpertine Gallery, London

 

Molla Nasreddin featured in a special presentation at the Bidoun Library at Art Dubai. 

 

Presentation of Molla Nasreddin at the Global Art Forum, Art Dubai.

 

Molla Nasreddin: Embrace Your Antithesis talk at SALT Beyoğlu, Istanbul

 

Molla Nasreddin as part of A Rock and Hard Place at Alatza imaret, Thessaloniki Biennale: 3

 

Book Launch at Swiss Institute, New York

 

The Library of Equivocation (detail), river-beds, kilims, books, 2011

 

 

Adam Budak’s East: Excitable Speech: West as part of curated by_Vienna 2011. Installation view, Kerstin Engholm Galerie. Photo by Karl Kühn.